lackofvision:

One of the worst feelings has got to be when you’re prepared for Under Pressure and Ice Ice Baby comes on instead

(via your-garden-variety-fangirl)

satans-advocate:

sext: i want to pay bills and share household duties and approach our late 20’s in a financially and emotionally stable way with you

(via sylvia-jayne)

thecutestofthecute:

Australian Cattle Dog/Blue Heeler Appreciation Post

(via ricrodrigo)

shittier:

who is she

(Source: cyndaquilz, via frizzyheaded)

suicideblonde:

Cher

jtotheizzoe:

skunkbear:

The recent release of “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" reminded me of one of my favorite ape vs. man films – this 1932 video that shows a baby chimpanzee and a baby human undergoing the same basic psychological tests.

Its gets weirder – the human baby (Donald) and the chimpanzee baby (Gua) were both raised as humans by their biological/adopted father Winthrop Niles Kellogg.  Kellogg was a comparative psychologist fascinated by the interplay between nature and nurture, and he devised a fascinating (and questionably ethical) experiment to study it:

Suppose an anthropoid were taken into a typical human family at the day of birth and reared as a child. Suppose he were fed upon a bottle, clothed, washed, bathed, fondled, and given a characteristically human environment; that he were spoken to like the human infant from the moment of parturition; that he had an adopted human mother and an adopted human father.

First, Kellogg had to convince his pregnant wife he wasn’t crazy:

 …the enthusiasm of one of us met with so much resistance from the other that it appeared likely we could never come to an agreement upon whether or not we should even attempt such an undertaking.

She apparently gave in, because Donald and Gua were raised, for nine months, as brother and sister. Much like Caesar in the “Planet of the Apes” movies, Gua developed faster than her “brother,” and often outperformed him in tasks. But she soon hit a cognitive wall, and the experiment came to an end. (Probably for the best, as Donald had begun to speak chimpanzee.)

You can read more about Kellogg’s experiment, its legacy, and public reaction to it here.

This is the most adorable experiment that has ever been done.

(via alexanderpander)

tastefullyoffensive:

[via]

insanitybreach:

See this is actually a really neat look at how history works.

Who writes the history books?

The survivors.

Who survives?

The victors.

(Source: whitejadeflower, via ricrodrigo)

ladoddsy:

streetlightarson:

perfectperfidy:

boxlunches:


The Iron Throne as described in the novels, officially endorsed by GRRM on his blog as the most accurate artistic representation thus far. By artist Marc Simonetti.

Oh

What the fuck that isn’t safe

No, it’s not. The histories talk about how the throne is cruel to unworthy kings. Jaime would talk about how Aerys Targaryen would constantly be covered in scabs from sitting on the throne carelessly. 

'No man should sit comfortably upon the throne'
It is meant to be an ugly, monstrous beauty. And several times during the books Joffrey cuts himself on throne.

ladoddsy:

streetlightarson:

perfectperfidy:

boxlunches:

The Iron Throne as described in the novels, officially endorsed by GRRM on his blog as the most accurate artistic representation thus far. By artist Marc Simonetti.

Oh

What the fuck that isn’t safe

No, it’s not. The histories talk about how the throne is cruel to unworthy kings. Jaime would talk about how Aerys Targaryen would constantly be covered in scabs from sitting on the throne carelessly. 

'No man should sit comfortably upon the throne'

It is meant to be an ugly, monstrous beauty. And several times during the books Joffrey cuts himself on throne.

(Source: jinx-effect, via ricrodrigo)

(Source: dorian-ino, via suicideblonde)